The Law of War and Peace (1625)by Hugo Grotius BOOK 1, CHAPTER 4War of Subjects Against SuperiorsI.     State of the question.II.     That as a general rule rebellion is not permitted by the law of nature.III.     That rebellion is not allowable according to Hebraic law.IV.     That rebellion is even less allowable according to the law of the Gospel; proof is presented from Holy Writ.V.     That rebellion is not allowable according to the practice of the early Christians.VI.     The view which holds that it is permissible for subordinate officials to rebel against sovereign authority is refuted, both by argument and by Holy Writ.VII.     What view is to be taken in care of extreme and in other respects unavoidable necessity.VIII.     That the right to make war may be conceded against him who has 'the chief authority among a free people.IX.     That the right to make war may be conceded against a king who has abdicated the sovereign power.X.     That the right to make war may be conceded against a king who alienates his kingdom, but only so far as to prevent the transfer.XI.     That the right to make war may be conceded against a king who openly shows himself the enemy of the whole people.XII.     That the right to make war may be conceded against a king who has lost his kingdom in consequence of a commissory law.XIII.     That the right to make war may be conceded against a king who, possessing only a part of the sovereign power, seeks to possess himself of the part that does not belong to him.XIV.     That the right to make war is conceded against a king in case liberty to offer resistance has in certain cases been reserved.XV.     How far obedience should be rendered to a usurper of sovereign power.XVI.     That resistance by force may be used against a usurper by virtue of a right of war still continuing.XVII.     That resistance by force maybe used against a usurper by virtue of a pre-existing law.XVIII.     That resistance by force may be used against a usurper by virtue of a mandate of one possessing sovereign power.XIX.     Why resistance to a usurper should be limited to the cases mentioned.XX.     When the right of sovereignty is in dispute private persons ought not to take it upon themselves to settle the matter.